Cruise ship programme on BBC World Service including my comments on Venice

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This 30 minute programme was broadcast on 23 August 2016 by the BBC World Service and is titled “Cruising: Bad for the World?” for the series “The Documentary”. It includes an interesting debate and my comments are in the first half of the programme, 3-4 minutes and 8-9 minutes in. It is especially remarkable to hear the comments of the people of Liverpool, UK, and Gabon, Africa, welcoming cruise ships, compared with some of the Venetian complaints against cruise ships. Click on the following link to hear the programme:

Cruising: Bad for the World?

This was the second in a two-part programmes on cruising. Both BBC World Service programmes also discuss the development of remote and exploration cruising in places like the Arctic since the opening of the Northwest Passage. The episodes are available free as BBC World Service podcasts by subscribing to “The Documentary” and can be downloaded here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02nq0lx/episodes/downloads

Part one focuses more on China and this is also fascinating to listen to, particularly about the growth of cruising which I debated with other speakers in October 2015 at the Battle of Ideas conference in London (as well as discussing many topics about humanity and the oceans). These were my introductory remarks:

I welcome any comments.

Thanks to BBC interviewer/broadcaster Philip Dodd and producer Mark Rickards.

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